Work will soon get underway to save a historic and much-loved tree in the middle of Hailsham town centre.

The mature Horse Chestnut – believed to be around 200-years-old – in the pedestrianised section of Hailsham High Street is suffering from a particular aggressive fungus, Brittle Cider Fungus, and Horse Chestnut bleeding Canker has also been detected on the stem.

The tree’s position sits within various land ownerships including Wealden District Council, which is now organising the remedial work.

State-of-the-art advanced decay detection systems were used to assess the overall health of the tree to help form an opinion on how structurally sound it is.

Experts say that after taking all of this information into account, it is prudent to reduce the overall size of the tree in order to ensure it can be retained for future generations. 

The tree crown will be sensitively reduced using professional best practice methods to save it in the coming weeks and further details will be posted on the council’s social media platforms.

The tree will be treated and cut back to save it in the coming weeks and further details will be posted on the council’s social media platforms.

It is likely that the area around the tree will be cordoned off while the works are ongoing.

Wealden District Council leader Councillor Bob Standley said, “This is a well-loved tree among the people of Hailsham and an important and valuable part of the town’s heritage.

“Rather than do nothing, the council has used modern decay detection systems and we are now in a position to carry out the remedial works to retain the tree.

“This will maintain the longevity of the tree as opposed to condemning it and eventually having to remove it.

“We are hoping when the remedial works get underway, any disruption to pedestrians and motorists will be kept to a minimum and apologise in advance for any inconvenience.”